Does Home Depot Buy Pallets? (Try This Instead)

If you have recently transported large items or have finished a construction project, you may have some spare pallets lying around.

If so, you might be wondering whether or not Home Depot buys pallets from customers or contractors after they have been used. Here is what I discovered.

Does Home Depot Buy Pallets In 2022?

Home Depot does not buy pallets from customers or contractors as of 2022. Instead, you can try and sell wooden and plastic pallets on Craigslist, The North American Pallet Recycling network, Facebook Marketplace, and other platforms. Pallets generally sell for 50 cents to $10 each.

For more information on why Home Depot doesn’t buy pallets, how to set a fixed pallet price, and whether Home Depot sells pallets, read on!

Where Can You Sell Pallets Instead?

Since wooden pallets are difficult to transport through the post, you should consider nearby companies that may be interested in buying them outright.

Craigslist is a popular site for anyone looking to connect with buyers in the local area, and you can market each palette at an individual price or in bundles.

The North American Pallet Recycling Network is also an established marketplace where American or Canadian residents can buy or sell wooden pallets.

The organization operates in all 50 states across North America. Similarly, you can contact local manufacturers to see whether they’d be interested in buying your unwanted pallets.

Alternatively, you can use online platforms such as Facebook Marketplace or eBay to list wooden pallets for sale.

You may save the hassle of transporting oversized pallets as they can be available for collection at a location of your choice.

What Is The Going Rate For Used Pallets?

The going rate for used pallets can depend on the quality of the pallet’s material and whether it is contaminated with food stains or chemicals.

When listing a pallet for sale, the price range typically starts at 50 cents up to $5.50 each. Here are the average prices of pallets.

  • Good quality or unused wooden pallets: $19 to $24
  • Used or recycled wooden pallets: $10 to $18
  • Plastic pallets: $10 to $45
  • Export-friendly pallets: $10 to $28
  • Custom-made pallets: $10 to $150

Does Home Depot Sell Pallets?

Does Home Depot Sell Pallets?

Yes, Home Depot offers a wide range of pallets made from wood, steel, polyethylene, PVC, or plastic.

Additionally, HomeDepot.com also sells pallets in a variety of colors, perfect for anyone looking to categorize supplies.

PVC or other plastic-made pallets are some of the most popular at Home Depot. For a standard 36 X 36 pallet, you can expect to pay around $84.

However, if you’re looking for something slightly cheaper, the pinewood 20 X 5 pallet costs $17.97 each. Customers can also purchase wood planks used to make or repair pallets for $29.91.

Where Can You Go To Buy Pallets?

Customers can head to most hardware stores such as Ace Hardware to purchase brand-new pallets from a trusted retailer. Specialist merchants may also sell a variety of pallet types.

Additionally, Walmart and Walmart.com is another excellent place to purchase affordable pallets.

Large unpainted wood pallets can cost as little as $4.97-$9.92 each.

However, this product is only available for pick up. Customers should head to the arts and crafts or hardware sections of a Walmart store.

If you want to learn more about the other things Home Depot is interested in buying, make sure to check if Home Depot buys used appliances, if Home Depot buys used tools, and if Home Depot recycles light bulbs.

Conclusion:

Home Depot does not buy pallets. However, customers can purchase a range of pallets made from wood, plastic, composite materials, and steal from a store or online.

You can sell pallets to buyers from Craigslist, local manufacturers, and online marketplace sites.

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Marques Thomas

Marques Thomas graduated with a MBA in 2011. Since then, Marques has worked in the retail and consumer service industry as a manager, advisor, and marketer. Marques is also the head writer and founder of QuerySprout.com.

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