Does Walmart Have Bottle Return? [Full Guide] 

Recycling bottles of beverages and drinks not only reduces costs for manufacturers, it is also good for the environment.

Since Walmart is one of the largest retailers of drinks and beverages in the U.S., you may be wondering: does Walmart have bottle return?  Here is what I’ve found out through my research!

Does Walmart Have Bottle Return In 2022? 

Walmart stores in Michigan, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and all Canadian provinces have bottle return as of 2022. You can return glass bottles of beverages and drinks sold by Walmart for a total of $25 in returns per person, per day. 

If you want to learn more about returning a bottle to Walmart, where in the U.S. and Canada you can return a bottle to Walmart, and much more, keep on reading! 

Where Does Walmart Have Bottle Return In The U.S?

Walmart has bottle return stations in states that have a ‘bottle bill’.

This refers to an arrangement in which retailers pay an extra deposit for beverages and soft drinks, which they can get back by returning the glass bottles. 

In the U.S., the following states have a bottle bill: 

  • California 
  • Michigan 
  • Delaware 
  • Iowa 
  • Connecticut 
  • Vermont 
  • Oregon 
  • New York 
  • Massachusetts 
  • Maine 

Therefore, Walmart stores in all of these states will have bottle return policies and stations where you can go to return a bottle and get a refund. 

Where Does Walmart Have Bottle Return In Canada? 

Yes, Walmart has bottle return services throughout Canada since all provinces have a bottle bill.

Therefore, you will be able to return glass bottles for refunds at Walmart stores in all Canadian provinces. 

How Do You Return A Bottle To Walmart? 

How Do You Return A Bottle To Walmart? 

You need to be living in one of the ten U.S. states listed above or in Canada if you want to return bottles to Walmart.

If that condition is met, you should use the Walmart Store Finder to first contact nearby Walmart stores and ask them about the availability of bottle return stations or vending machines. 

Once you know which store offers this service, you can head over to that store with the bottles you want to return and slot the bottles inside the return stations or the vending machine at the stores.

You can ask an employee about the location of the station inside the store. 

The vending machine or return station will then print out a receipt that you should take to the checkout counter.

The employee will scan the receipt and give you the refund amount for the bottles. Most Walmart stores accept a maximum of $25 in returns per person, per day. 

Which Bottles Can You Return To Walmart?

You can return glass bottles of any beverage, soft drink, or any other can.

Only glass bottles are accepted because these can be rewashed and refilled easily by the manufacturer. 

Can You Return A Bottle Not Bought From Walmart? 

You can return the glass bottle of a drink not bought from Walmart as long as the Walmart store you are returning it to has that item in its inventory. 

This is because the vending machine or return station scans the barcode on the bottle, and it will only recognize the product if it is also sold by that particular store. 

To learn more about how Walmart is helping the environment, you can see our other posts on the Walmart plastic bag recycling program, how Walmart is buying back phones, and if Costco and Target have a bottle return.

Conclusion: Does Walmart Have Bottle Return? 

Yes, Walmart stores in Canada and ten U.S. states, including Michigan, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, and Vermont, have bottle returns.

These stores accept glass bottles of beverages that are sold by those stores for a total of $25 in returns per person, per day. 

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Marques Thomas

Marques Thomas graduated with a MBA in 2011. Since then, Marques has worked in the retail and consumer service industry as a manager, advisor, and marketer. Marques is also the head writer and founder of QuerySprout.com.

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