Aldi Dog Food (Price, Types, Suppliers, Quality + More)

Giving our dogs the very best can come with a high price tag.

Anyone who has paid for premium dog food knows that keeping our pups in good nutrition is important as they age, but it’s not always feasible for lower incomes.

Aldi sells so much for so much less than their competition, and they have entered the dog food market as well.

You might be wondering about what this German supermarket chain has to offer Fido. Here’s what you need to know.

Aldi Dog Food Range In [currentyear]

Aldi sells dog food under both their Heart to Tail label and the higher-end Pure Being Premium label. Both labels carry wet and dry food options, and range in price from 45 cents to $9.69. The nutritional content varies from label to label, with the Pure Being food best overall.

For a more detailed breakdown of Aldi’s dog food, how the price compares to other brands, and an analysis of its quality, keep reading!

What Kind Of Dog Food Does Aldi Sell?

Despite their product list dwarfed in comparison to retail giants like Walmart, Aldi still sells an impressive variety of dog foods, with something for every palate, whether it’s a preference for taste, texture or ingredient. 

Heart to Tail Dog Food

Complete Nutrition Dry Dog Food: For bigger dogs (and economical dog owners), the complete nutrition dry dog food from Heart to Tail comes in an 18.5-lb. bag and sells for a mere $9.69. 

It does attempt to give dogs all the vitamins and minerals they need to live a long and healthy life, including Vitamins D and E, potassium chloride and folic acid. 

However, its ingredient list leaves much to be desired for some, as there is no actual meat in the food – just meat by-product. The first three ingredients are whole grain corn, meat and bone meal and corn germ meal.

Also, despite topping out at almost 20 lbs. owners of multiple big dogs might not find it as convenient as buying their usual brand, which may be sold in much bigger bags.

Canned: Small-to-medium dogs (or big dogs who appreciate a nice topping as a treat now and then) are likely to enjoy Heart to Tail’s canned flavors, including Grilled Chicken, Filet Mignon and Prime Rib, all in 3.5-oz tins, which sell for 45 cents each.

Pure Being Dog Food

The Pure Being line is aimed at delivering more nutritious, wholesome ingredients – no fillers, no artificial flavors or colors, and meat is the first (and therefore most abundant) ingredient.

Canned: These 14.1-oz. cans come in three flavors: Beef and Chicken, Chicken, Vegetables and Brown Rice, Salmon and Potatoes at $1.59 each. 

There is one huge caveat to this canned food, however. Despite the label and the promising start to the ingredient list, dogfood.guide points out that the food contains carrageenan.

Carrageenan is a big no in human foods, as it has been linked to different types of cancer and gastrointestinal issues, and while there is nothing conclusive about its effect on dogs, it might cause “inflammation, lesions, and worse.”

Dry: The dry Pure Being dog food fares much better, however, with its Chicken & Rice (5-lb. bag) and Salmon & Potato (4-lb. bag) flavors.

The Salmon & Potato recipe contains such nutritious ingredients as deboned salmon, sweet potatoes, whole ground garbanzo beans (chick peas), peas, lentils, fish oil and dried cranberries in greatest amount. 

In this instance, Aldi’s Pure Being label delivers on the wholesome and nutritious claim.

Is Aldi Dog Food A Good Deal?

Is Aldi Dog Food A Good Deal?

You’re probably already aware that Aldi prices everything – including their dog food – lower than most supermarkets would (or can!). But is it a good deal, all things considered?

Let’s compare a few different options.

Aldi’s Heart to Tail Complete Nutrition clocks in at around 54 cents per pound; a similar Pedigree bag costs 69 cents per pound at Wegmans. (Both contain whole grain corn, meat and bone meal and corn gluten or germ meal as their first three ingredients.)

So in this instance, if budget is your top priority and you’re not as concerned about serving the fanciest ingredients, the Heart to Tail version is a good deal.

I’ll break it down for another option. The Pure Being Dry dog food sells for under $6 (or $1.47 per pound), while Rachel Ray Nutrish Zero Grain costs $1.80 per pound (or $9.87 per 5.5-lb. bag). 

In both cases, the two top ingredients are chicken and chicken meal (the meal being acceptable in both instances because the source – chicken – is named). Saving over three dollars, in fact, saving nearly four dollars per comparable-sized bag makes this a good deal, too.

Aldi’s wet dog food compares favorably to name brands as well. 

The Pure Being wet food in a 14.1-oz. can costs $1.59 or 11 cents per ounce., while a similar name brand item, the Blue Buffalo Homestyle Recipe Natural wet dog food in a 12.5-oz. can costs $2.08 or 17 cents per ounce at Walmart, Aldi’s discount competitor.

Blue Buffalo’s comes in a smaller can, costs more, and its ingredient list isn’t significantly more healthy or wholesome than the Pure Being can, which also lists a real protein and broth as its first ingredients. (Blue Buffalo’s also contains carrageenan, by the way.)

Ultimately, Aldi’s canned dog food holds its own against the better-known Blue Buffalo brand, and it will save you some change at the register, too. This is a terrific value.

Aldi’s dog food is a good deal overall, whether you’re buying a standard bag or prefer a higher-end product.

But because the Aldi dog food comes in smaller bags, it might not be a great deal in terms of convenience (hey, your time is a resource, too!). 

Is Aldi Dog Food Good Quality?

Is Aldi Dog Food Good Quality?

Aldi’s Heart to Tail label food is not the best quality food for your pup.

However, its ingredients are very similar to its direct competition in the name brand field, so it’s not as if the quality is outstandingly bad compared to anything else on the market.

The Pure Being line of food is another story, though.

This food contains mostly wholesome and nutritious ingredients, things we’d be happy to feed our children or ourselves (like chick peas, blueberries and cranberries, for example). 

The Pure Being food is good quality – not the very best, not top-tier, but good, and a much healthier option than the Heart to Tail label. You could proudly feed your dog this food and feel good about the choice. 

Where Is Aldi Dog Food Made?

Aldi isn’t exactly forthcoming about who manufactures their dog food, but some labels indicate it comes from the U.S., while others, namely the canned food, is a product of the Netherlands.

However, the packaging should clearly state where the food was made.

I was able to find the manufacturer of Aldi’s Pure Being Chicken and Brown Rice Recipe food, however.

It’s made by Sunshine Mills, a company that has been in the dog food business since 1960.

Their corporate office is in Alabama, but they have an office in Elkhart, Indiana – about 150 miles from Aldi US HQ in Batavia, IL.

Sunshine Mills also manufactures dog food under labels such as Sportsman’s Pride, Nurture Farms and Evolve.

To learn more, you can also see our related posts on whether or not Aldi allows dogs, who make Aldi products, and where does Aldi beef comes from.

Conclusion

Dog food can be a very expensive part of pet ownership, but Aldi makes it a little easier on your wallet, with budget-priced regular food for those want the most economical choice, and grain-free options for owners whose first priority is wholesome nutrition.

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Marques Thomas

Marques Thomas graduated with a MBA in 2011. Since then, Marques has worked in the retail and consumer service industry as a manager, advisor, and marketer. Marques is also the head writer and founder of QuerySprout.com.

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