USPS Guitar Shipping (Can You Ship It, Price, Steps + More)

USPS provides a ton of useful shipping services, even for more unusual shipments such as guitars.

But how much does it cost to ship a guitar with USPS, and what are the steps you can take to make sure it arrives safely?

USPS Guitar Shipping In 2022

USPS does ship guitars; in fact, the general consensus seems to be that USPS is the best choice for shipping guitars. There are lots of factors that play into the cost of shipping a guitar, especially the distance your guitar will be traveling, but typically 2 Day Priority shipping for an average-sized guitar with $1,000 insurance costs around $65.

As stated above, there are a lot of factors that play into how much shipping a guitar costs and how to ship it safely, so be sure to check out the rest of the article to learn more!

How Much Does It Cost To Ship A Guitar With USPS?

The cost of shipping anything with USPS depends on a multitude of factors such as shipping weight, dimensions, and destination.

Taking into consideration that the average guitar is around 12 lbs and about 40 inches in length, I went ahead and did the math for you!

Shipping an average guitar with Priority Mail Express 1-Day shipping will cost about $125, whereas Priority Mail 2-Day shipping will cost closer to $55.

You can also ship your guitar using USPS Retail Ground and Media Mail for options less than $50, but these services tend to take longer.

It’s always a good idea to ensure expensive packages when shipping, and $1,000 package insurance coverage typically costs around $15 with USPS.

Keep in mind, the distance your package travels also plays a role in the cost of shipping, so if you’re planning on shipping to a more remote location or to somewhere far away, shipping may cost more!

To get the dimensions of different guitars to help you calculate a personal shipping price, you can click here.

You can also get an estimate on pricing with USPS by checking out their retail postage price calculator.

What Types Of Shipping Services Can You Use To Ship A Guitar With USPS?

What Types Of Shipping Services Can You Use To Ship A Guitar With USPS?

When shipping a guitar with USPS, you have four different types of services available to you.

The fastest, but most expensive option is Priority Mail Express 1-Day, which guarantees your package will arrive in 24 hours and that your package will be prioritized above all others for shipment.

Priority Mail 2-Day shipping is a good middle ground if you want to save a little money but still want your guitar to arrive in 48 hours.

You can also ship a guitar with USPS Retail Ground Shipping. This option is usually around $10 cheaper than Priority Mail 2-Day shipping but arrives a few days later since this shipping option only uses trucks to ship rather than planes.

The least expensive option available to you for shipping is Media Mail, but there are more restrictions, and this option typically takes the longest to deliver out of all of your choices.

How Do You Ship A Guitar With USPS?

The first thing you can do to ensure your guitar arrives to its destination safely is to prepare the guitar itself.

Loosening the guitar strings (or removing them completely, if you choose to) is essential to prevent the strings from snapping due to pressure, and be sure to remove or secure any movable parts.

Make sure you pad the fretboard under the strings to prevent scrapes, and wrap the headstock securely with bubble wrap or another type of padding held in place by rubber bands or tape.

After you’ve prepped the guitar, you can pack it into either a hard case or a gig bag.

It’s usually recommended to use a hard case when shipping a guitar as it provides an extra layer of protection.

You can pack the inside of the case or gig bag with foam, packing peanuts, or bubble wrap, and be sure to pad the bottom of the guitar against the case as well.

The neck of the guitar should also have extra padding, as it’s one of the most delicate parts of the guitar.

Once you’ve sealed the guitar into the carrying case, do a gentle shake test to see if it moves around inside the case.

If it does, that’s a good indication that you should add extra padding!

Once you can’t hear movement inside the case, you can pick your shipping box.

For an average-sized guitar, it’s recommended to use a box with about 200-250 lbs of burst strength (more information on box burst strength can be found here).

All that’s left to do after your guitar is in the box is to secure it with high-quality packaging tape and do another gentle shake test to ensure everything is secure!

After all of these steps are completed, you can ship your guitar as you usually would by taking it to your local post office.

Is It Safe To Ship A Guitar With USPS?

It absolutely is safe to ship a guitar with USPS!

After checking a bunch of well-known guitar forums, it seems the general consensus is that USPS is the best choice for shipping a guitar, both in price and safety.

If you’re interested in taking a look at what other people have to say, you can check out this forum.

To know more about USPS delivery services, you can also check our posts on whether or not USPS packages are insured, if USPS delivers at night, and if USPS updates tracking.

Conclusion

USPS is the best option for shipping guitars.

USPS Priority Mail 2-Day shipping for guitars typically costs $65 with insurance coverage of $1,000.

You have four shipping services to choose from when shipping a guitar with USPS, including Priority Mail Express 1-Day, Priority Mail 2-Day, Ground Retail, and Media Mail, all of which have different price points and arrival times.

While USPS is certainly a safe option when shipping guitars, it’s always important to pack your guitar correctly before shipping by using plenty of bubble wrap and loosening the strings, as well as choosing a good case and box to ship it in.

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Marques Thomas

Marques Thomas graduated with a MBA in 2011. Since then, Marques has worked in the retail and consumer service industry as a manager, advisor, and marketer. Marques is also the head writer and founder of QuerySprout.com.

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