FedEx Scams (10 Scams To Be Aware Of + How To Avoid)

It’s no secret that FedEx is one of the most popular courier services in the world; however, as with anything popular, there are always scammers out there who try to take advantage of people. 

This blog post will outline some of the most common FedEx scams and provide tips on avoiding them!

FedEx Scams In 2022

FedEx has been targeted by scam artists who pose as FedEx employees, family members, and government officials to reach out and steal your personal information or get money in 2022. These criminals may create links on fake websites designed for theft, leading customers to believe they’re going somewhere safe when it leads straight to these hackers!

Be sure to keep reading for a complete list of the most common FedEx scams and how to avoid them, whether you’re a first-time FedEx user or a longtime customer!

1. FedEx Work At Home Scam

Although there are a few variations of this scam, the idea is that someone poses as a FedEx employee and offers people the opportunity to work from home, packing and shipping packages.

However, the catch is that the victim must pay for their supplies, which the scammer often provides.

Sometimes, the scammer will ask for personal information such as social security numbers or bank account information.

How To Avoid The Work From Home Scam

FedEx does not hire people to work from home packing and shipping packages. Therefore, if you receive an offer like this, it is a scam. 

Instead, look on the FedEx website to find legitimate job openings in your area.

2. Online Marketplace Fraud

This scam happens when someone buys an item from an online marketplace such as eBay or Craigslist, and then the seller uses FedEx to ship the item.

However, the seller sends a fake or empty box instead of the actual item. Then, the buyer is out of money for the item and has to pay for shipping.

How To Avoid Online Marketplace Fraud

When you’re buying something online, be sure to use a reputable marketplace such as Amazon, eBay, or Craigslist.

In addition, pay with a credit card so you can dispute the charges if you don’t receive your item.

3. Grandparent/Elder Fraud

In this type of scam, the scammer will call an older person and pose as their grandchild. Then, they will say they are in some kind of trouble and need money to be sent to them via FedEx.

Of course, the grandchild never received the money because it was all a scam.

How To Avoid Elder Fraud

If you receive a call like this, do not send any money. Instead, try to verify that the person calling is your grandchild.

You can do this by asking them questions to which only they would know the answer.

However, if you’re still unsure, you can always contact other family members to see if they’ve recently heard from your grandchild.

4. Government Impersonation Scam

Similarly, with this scam, the scammer will call or email their victim claiming to be from the government.

Then, they will say that the victim owes money or has a package that must be shipped via FedEx.

After that, the scammer will ask for personal information or money to complete the transaction.

How To Avoid Government Impersonation Scams

Do not provide personal information or money to someone claiming to be from the government.

If you’re not sure if the person contacting you is legitimate, you can always hang up and call the government agency they claim to be from using a number you know is real.

For example, if they claim to be from the IRS, you can call 1-800-829-1040 to speak to someone.

5. Credit Card Fraud

5. Credit Card Fraud FedEx

Another reasonably common scam with a few different variations is credit card fraud. In one variation, the victim is contacted by someone claiming to be from FedEx.

First, they will say there was an issue with a recent shipment, and the victim’s credit card information was compromised.

Next, they will ask for the victim’s credit card number to process a refund. Of course, this is just a way for the scammer to get the victim’s credit card information.

In another variation, the scammer will send a fake package to the victim via FedEx.

However, the scammer calls the victim and says there was an issue with the delivery and they need the victim’s credit card information to process a refund.

Again, this is just a way for the scammer to get the victim’s credit card information.

How To Avoid Credit Card Fraud

Do not share your credit card information with someone you don’t know.

Also, if you are contacted by someone claiming to be from FedEx, do not give them any personal information.

Instead, hang up or delete the email and then contact FedEx yourself to verify that there is an issue.

6. Payroll (And Other Checks) Processing

In this scam, the scammer will send a check to their victim via FedEx. They will then say that the victim must deposit the check and use the money to ship something via FedEx.

However, the problem is that the check is fake, and the victim is out of any money they spent on shipping.

How To Avoid Payroll Processing Scams

Do not deposit a check from someone you don’t know. Instead, if you receive a check in the mail, you can always call the company it’s supposedly from to verify that it’s real.

In addition, never spend any of the money from a check until it has cleared your bank, which can take a few days.

7. FedEx Secret Shopper Scam

With this scam, the victim is contacted by someone claiming to be from FedEx.

Also, they will say that the victim has been selected to be a secret shopper, and they need to buy some gift cards to test the service.

After you purchase gift cards and ship them to the crook, they will promise to send you a check as payment.

However, the scammer keeps the gift cards you bought rather than sending you payment.

How To Avoid Secret Shopper Scams

Customers should never buy gift cards or wire money to someone they don’t know.

8. Instant Messaging (IM) Attack

Typically, this type of scam starts with a pop-up message on the victim’s computer.

On their screen, a message will say that there is a problem with their FedEx account, and they need to click on a link to update their information.

Of course, this link will take them to a fake website where they will be asked to enter their personal data.

How To Avoid IM Attacks

Never click on links in pop-up messages, even if they look legitimate. Also, if you are concerned about your FedEx account, you can always go to the website and log in.

Finally, you should have anti-virus software installed on your computer to protect against pop-ups.

9. Phishing Emails

Similar to the IM attack, customers receive an email that will claim to be from FedEx, and it will say that there is a problem with the victim’s account.

Again, they will be asked to click on a link to update their information and be taken to a fake website where they will be asked to enter their personal information.

How To Avoid Phishing

To protect your information, never click on links in emails. Instead, go to the FedEx website and review your account. 

Finally, ensure you have an up to date anti-virus software installed on your computer designed to prevent phishing attacks.

10. Smishing

Smishing is a type of phishing attack that uses text messages instead of email.

Here, the victim will receive a text message from the scammer claiming to be from FedEx and be asked to provide secure information or directed to a fake website. 

How To Avoid Smishing

Do not send your credit card information to someone you don’t know via text message.

In addition, if you are contacted by someone claiming to be from FedEx, do not give them any personal information. Instead, contact the company yourself to verify that there is an issue.

To know more, you can also read our posts on FedEx return label, if you can cancel a FedEx shipment, and FedEx UK shipping.

Conclusion

Some of these FedEx scams are more common than others, but all of them can be avoided if you’re aware of them.

Remember, if something sounds too good to be true or you’re being asked for personal information, it’s probably a scam.

Also, do not provide any information or money to these scammers. Instead, delete any links and report the incident to FedEx.

Taking these precautions can help protect yourself and others from becoming victims of these scams!

Photo of author

Marques Thomas

Marques Thomas graduated with a MBA in 2011. Since then, Marques has worked in the retail and consumer service industry as a manager, advisor, and marketer. Marques is also the head writer and founder of QuerySprout.com.

Leave a Comment