5 Reasons Why Walmart Tires Are So Cheap! 

While Walmart is best known for its huge range of cheap products, Walmart also offers an extensive range of car services.

So if you are looking to get your tires replaced at Walmart or looking to buy a new set of tires, you may have noticed that Walmart’s prices are lower than most competitors. But why is this? Here is what I found!

5 Reasons Why Walmart Tires Are So Cheap In [currentyear]!


1. Walmart Uses Tires To Attract Customers To Their Other Services

One of the primary reasons Walmart tires are so cheap is that Walmart wants to lure customers into their automotive services.

So if a customer buys the cheaper tires, Walmart has a better chance of upselling customers to other services like tire installation, tire balancing, flat tires, and even serpentine belts, which is where they make most of the profits.

Because of this, Walmart customers pay an average of $102 per car tire at Walmart, considerably lower than its competitors like Costco, who’s average tire sells for $165 each, and Discount Tire Direct that sells tires at an average price of $144.

Additionally, Walmart.com guarantees to price online match competitors, including AutoZone.com, Amazon.com, and Target.com, to ensure customers receive the lowest possible price. 

2. Walmart Has Exclusive Agreements With Tire Brands

Another reason why Walmart tires are so inexpensive is that Walmart collaborates with well-known brands such as Goodyear, Michelin, Uniroyal, Toyo, and Mastercraft Tires to manufacture cheaper tire ranges. 

For example, the popular line of Douglas tires is created by recognized brand Goodyear and is sold exclusively at Walmart for dirt-cheap prices.

While Douglas tires are reported to have good traction and grip in dry conditions, they suffer in wet conditions, unlike premium tires.

Additionally, premium car branded tires typically last 30,000-60,000 miles, whereas customers have reported Walmart tires to last 20,000 miles. 

3. Affordable Installation Fees

Another reason why Walmart tires are so cheap is by offering affordable installation fees in correspondence with low-value tires. 

As an example, Walmart customers will pay an essential installation cost of $12-15 per tire, comparably lower than competitor rates like Discount Tire Direct who charges $19, BJ’s Tire Center charges $20, and Town Fair Tire Centers charge $23.

4. Customers Cannot Return Used Tires

Despite Walmart’s flexible returns policy, customers are restricted when it comes to returning tires. For example, Walmart will only accept tire returns within 90 days of the purchase, or delivery date provided the tires are unused.

If Walmart customers want a longer protection plan, they will need to upgrade to the Road Hazard Warranty, which starts at $10 per tire and covers the lifetime use of the tire.

Within this warranty, customers will be covered with unforeseen road hazards, flat tires, and free replacement when the tire is non-repairable within the initial 25% of tread wear.

5. Additional Services Not Included

When you visit a Walmart Auto Care Center, you’ll only pay for the same service you received; you will not receive additional perks or packages. Customers will only pay for the tires they receive and installation for each one. 

Additional services such as tire rotation, flat tire repair (when you do not have Road Hazard Warranty), lung nut replacement, lube, oil change, and other maintenance are available for an extra cost each.

Conclusion

Walmart maintains low-cost tires at an average of $102 per tire to ensure they provide cheaper tires than its competitors. Therefore, Walmart charges affordable installation fees of $12-$15, also lower than competitors.

Tires are non-returnable if they have been used. Additionally, well-known manufacturers design lower-quality tires for Walmart. 

Photo of author

Marques Thomas

Marques Thomas graduated with a MBA in 2011. Since then, Marques has worked in the retail and consumer service industry as a manager, advisor, and marketer. Marques is also the head writer and founder of QuerySprout.com.

Leave a Comment